Providing Water to Toronto General Hospital with Greater Efficiency and Reliability

Providing Water to Toronto General Hospital with Greater Efficiency and Reliability

Most of us don’t think much about how we get our water.  It’s almost always available and relatively inexpensive.   For the vast majority in Canada it’s just one of the great benefits of living here.  However, the result is that we Canadian’s are not very good at managing our water consumption, as you can see in the graph below.

There’s a pretty clear inverse correlation between the price of water and the consumption of water.  It makes sense.  Generally the more something costs, the more careful people are with it.  That’s pretty similar to how we manage electricity too.

Our domestic water requires both water treatment and power for pumping.  Old pumping system were generally very inefficient designs because electricity was cheap and technology was expensive.  That’s one of the problems we had with the old domestic cold water booster pumps at Toronto General Hospital.

Water Consumption - Polaris

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Happy Green Holidays!

Hello Everyone! I am a University of Toronto Student taking my Master’s in Health Science in Health Administration and currently working with the fantastic Energy and Environment team. This is be my first stab at the Talkin’ Trash blog so be gentle with me…

Here are some ideas for a greener holiday!

image credit: Hotel-R

image credit: Hotel-R

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Say Hi to Allan, our new Building Control Specialist

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Savings at PMCRT will Blow You Away!

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Princess Margaret Cancer Research Tower. Photo Credit

Next in our list of exciting energy endeavors, this blog will discuss huge savings realized by a retrofit to the laboratory exhaust system at the Princess Margaret Cancer Research Tower (PMCRT). The lab exhaust system has been converted from constant speed to demand controlled to ensure more efficient operation. I’ll get into all the super interesting details below, but the best part is the savings so I’ll start off with that. Continue reading

Lighting – Part 2: Occupancy and Daylight Controls

In my last lighting blog I promised to provide real data on real projects and I have one for you today.  At Toronto General Hospital, Henry Gomolka (TGH’s lighting guru) has recently finished the installation of daylight and occupancy sensors in the in the lobbies of the Munk patient elevators (floor 3 to 12).  These sensors will shut off the lights when the space is unoccupied or when there is sufficient daylight in the space.  I’ll get to the details in a minute, but I want to share some of the results first.  Also, if you want an introduction to the control types, I have a quick primer at the end.

Project snapshot:Graph2
• TGH Munk Patient Elevator Lobbies
• Occupancy and daylight sensors installed in lobbies on 10 floors, on/off control
• Total Lighting Power = 7200 Watts
• Emergency Lights = 1800 Watts
• 24/7 operation
• Estimated Consumption Savings = 30% = 15,000kWh

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